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Fort Provintia

BuiIt in 1653, Fort Provintia, popularly known as the Red-Haired tower, is located on the shore across the Tai-Chiang inland sea from Fort Zeelandia.  It is another important fort built by the Dutch during their occupation in Taiwan.  The fort was built in response to an uprising in the year before.  Before the construction of the fort, the site of the fort was an aboriginal village named Sakam.  Bricks were the main material for the fort while the mixture of the glutinous rice, sugar, sand and ground sea shells was used as the mortar, the same as those at Fort Zeelandia.  The scale of the Fort Provintia was relative small and no parapets were provided.  Inside the wall of the fort, there were a 36-foot high pavilion and two watch towers located at both north and south part of the fort.

Ford Provintia, known as the Red-Haired tower, was built in 1653. It is another significant fort located on the shore across the Tai-Chiang Inland Sea from Fort Zeelandia built by the Dutch.  Sakam, and aboriginal village, was the original name before the construction of the fort. Same as Ford Zeelandia, the material of the fort was bricks form Java with the mixture of glutinous rice, sugar, sand and ground seashells as the mortar.  Compare to other forts, Fort Provintia was small and no parapets.  There were a 36-foot high pavilion and two towers inside the wall of the fort. Fort Provintia was center of the colony where the Dutch East India Company installed the administration during the Dutch Occupied period.

Koxinga changed the name of the fort to Cheng-Tien Fu after he reigned the rule of Taiwan in 1661.  The fort was used as a gunpowder magazine then. It was ravaged during the military campaign of Chu I-Kuei in 1720 and destroyed by several earthquakes in the following years. The Wen-Chang Ka (Temple of God of Literature) and Hai-Shen Miao (temple of Sea God) was built by the county magistrate in 1879. It is unique with the combination of traditional Taiwanese pavilions and the Dutch fort foundation in Taiwan. After 1945, the fort was named Chin-Kan Lou and became a exhibition center.

xAncient Ming TombsxAn-Ping SettlementxArtillery FortificationsxBuddhist MonasteriesxCity God TemplexCity Walls & GatesxConfucian TemplexFamily ShrinesxForeign Merchant HousesxFort ProvintiaxFort ZeelandiaxHistorical WellsxHistorical Western Style ArchitecturexHouses & GardensxKoxinga's ShrinexMartial TemplesxMedical God TemplesxMemorial Stone GatesxPantheon of Universal DeitiesxPresbyterian ArchitecturexTemple of the Five ConcubinesxTemples of Heavenly Holy MotherxTemples of Supreme Emperor of Dark HeavenxVegetarian Hallsx